Drugs: War on Poverty

I've been traveling for about twenty hours when I climb out of the metro train. So at first I think I'm daydreaming when a man offers me Oxycodone on the street corner. I politely decline and keep walking. Then I notice a woman on the ground smoking from a crack pipe. I try not to... Continue Reading →

A retrospective: Banjul

In Banjul: there are open sewers criss-crossed by overhead telegraph poles. there are rusty tin-roofed buildings with moats of standing water. industrial rubbish lines the streets. naturally, there is dust. At the tranquil intersection of Daniel Goddard Street and Independence Avenue, a man pisses against a wall. In any other global city this would be... Continue Reading →

Crossing the border, waking the dead

The Gambian border post at Amdallai looks the same as back in 2006. I do not have my belongings searched and am not told lies about carrying illegal materials (such as a radio) as I was back then. There is much less corruption. I walk past the detention cage to the interview room where the... Continue Reading →

Man

"Man is now able to fly through the air like a bird, he is able to swim under the sea like a fish, he is able burrow beneath the ground like a mole. Now if only he could walk the earth like a man, this would be paradise." Tommy Douglas

Bakau: More Breakfast, Less Fear

I last had breakfast in The Gambia thirteen years ago. I don't remember what the breakfast tasted like, but I do remember feeling both amused and nauseous. Yahya Jammeh, then president, was making a televised appearance. He directly addressed 'all homosexuals' in The Gambia, kindly offering them forty-eight hours to leave the country. At the... Continue Reading →

Oran: Architecture in Transformation

It is dark when I wake up. The hillside twinkles between navy sea and sky. Under my window, traffic flows paint the beginnings of day. A single crane on the horizon symbolises the building of this modern Algerian city. I take my breakfast facing the the coastline as the natural pastels of morning develop beyond... Continue Reading →

Cap Skirring

We descend the rang-rang [dust road] surrounded by dense vegetation. Eventually it swings around and Mamadou and I catch our first glimpse of sand. From here to Venezuela there is only sea. We emerge onto a vast beach. Atlantic waves crash powerfully onto the distant shoreline. We walk towards Guinea-Bissau, taking care to avoid rabid... Continue Reading →

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